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Viagra for Women: Does it exist?

The female version of Viagra exists – and we’re not talking about the old-school aphrodisiacs like oysters and strange herbs. Nope. When ladies are feeling blue in the bedroom, they now have a choice between an injection or a great pink pill called Lovegra to spice things up. However, the path to medically-assisted bliss is a lane that brings both roses and thorns. We will talk you through all the important points.

 

The problem many modern women face 

 

Considering that as much as 50% of women – billions worldwide – experience dissatisfaction, then that’s a pretty big “yes” for a solution. For them, libido or orgasm (sometimes both) is missing in action. Both are important ingredients for a healthy sex life. But there’s no lack of interfering characters, including daily stress, medical conditions, menopause or the effects of pregnancy. 

 

Nature’s challenge

 

Women have complex biology and sexuality. This slowed the invention of a happy pill and made some gals turn to Viagra. The move was misguided. There’s a persistent myth that Viagra triggers arousal. A few ladies thought, “Okay, yeah. I need some arousal. Gimme that blue one.” Very logical thinking but Viagra doesn’t work for women because it focuses on the male plumbing. Like, physically. The medication wasn’t designed to put the sparkle in anyone’s eye, unfortunately.

 

Then The FDA Finally Approved Three Drugs 

 

Just a little secret: the third one might be the best!

 

But first, meet Addyi and  . They might sound like a foreign dish but the pair is the closest thing to a female version of Viagra. Addyi was originally an antidepressant drug and when taken daily, could haul libido out of the ashes. But don’t uncork the champagne just yet. The side-effects are hairy. Instead of a glowing attraction, people can feel dizzy, experience a serious drop in blood pressure and some even black out. Alcohol can aggravate the symptoms and the medication doesn’t work for some. Curiously, it takes eight weeks to realize that Addyi doesn’t light your fire but that’s the recommended time period to wait. When it fails, experts recommend that the women stop using the drug. 

 

Vyleesi isn’t for the squeamish. Around 45 minutes before getting amorous, this liquid is injected into the abdomen or thigh. When things go wrong, lovey-dovey feelings are replaced with irritation at the site of injection, headaches, feeling green around the gills and running to the bathroom to barf. Doctors have also warned that Vyleesi cannot be used more than once a day or eight times a month.

 

Despite their monsters-in-the-closet side, Addyi and Vyleesi are helping women. Unlike Viagra, they don’t target a physical process. At the risk of getting a little too personal, Viagra relaxes all the right spots and muscles to increase blood flow to the genitals – a critical step in achieving an erection. Addyi and Vyleesi skip all that. They’ve achieved what people mistakenly think Viagra can do and that is to increase the hubba hubba (otherwise known as the sex drive).

 

Interestingly, experts don’t know the full story behind why these drugs work. Only that they somehow charm the melanocortin and serotonin receptors in the brain.

 

The Third Option – Hello Good Times!

 

Addyi and Vyleesi only provide a modest improvement. Women can also use a product called Silagra, a lovely pink tablet. It contains Sildenafil Citrate, which stimulates both the genitals and sexual desire. It helps to overcome common problems like irritation during intercourse and a lack of orgasms. Basically, this is a wonderful all-rounder for anyone who likes intense foreplay, excitement, and physical pleasure to be a part of the package. More perks include its low cost, that the effects can be felt quickly, and also that they last up to six hours! 

 

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